Omaha Catholic School Parents Express Concerns Over New Policy

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Following the release of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese’s policy on gender identity, parents and community activists are voicing their concerns. The policy is set to take effect Jan. 1 of the 2022-23 school year and, according to the archdiocese, goes along with church teachings. Melissa Wegner, a parent with experience in the Catholic school system, believes the policy is too aggressive and too broad. “I think it’s going to make these kids realize there’s something wrong with them,” Wegner said. they’re not old enough to figure out what to do, they’re not old enough to know if they’re a girl or a boy,” PFLAG secretary Jamie Shipman said. “You know what, they’re old enough to know that they can kill themselves and that doesn’t stop them.” Under the new policy, students in all Catholic schools in Omaha will be treated according to their sex assigned at birth. “We wanted membership and awareness and all school communities know what this policy was going to be. So we thought we’d just go with it,” said Deacon Tim McNeil, spokesman for the Archdiocese of Omaha. gender identity contrary to Church teachings and theology on the nature of humanity and God’s purpose, and requires staff to act toward a person based on their biological sex at birth. students will also be required to act, dress and use the restroom the same and will not be able to join sports teams that oppose their biological sex. Shipman thinks the policy is hypocritical. “If you just sit there and force all these rules saying you can’t do this, this, this and that, well, why can’t you?” Shipman asked. “They don’t even talk about it. If you love someone, it comes from the heart and if you really have the spirit of God inside of you, your heart will want to help and do for others.” Deacon McNeil says politics comes from a place of love and welcomes all discussions this school year.” Our philosophy for the future is truth and love. We share the truth with our students and their families. compassion,” McNeil said. You can read the full policy here.

Following the release of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese’s policy on gender identity, parents and community activists are expressing concern.

The policy is set to take effect Jan. 1 of the 2022-2023 school year and, according to the archdiocese, goes hand-in-hand with church teachings.

Melissa Wegner, a parent with experience in the Catholic school system, believes the policy is too aggressive and too broad.

“I think it’s going to send the message to these kids that there’s something wrong with them,” Wegner said.

PFLAG of Omaha, a support group for those dealing with LGBTQIA+ issues, said the policy poses a threat to the safety of children.

“They’re not old enough to figure out what to do, they’re not old enough to know if they’re a girl or a boy,” PFLAG secretary Jamie Shipman said. “You know what, they’re old enough to know they can kill themselves and that doesn’t stop them.”

Under the new policy, students at all Catholic schools in Omaha will be treated based on their assigned sex at birth.

“We wanted membership and outreach and all school communities to know what this policy was going to be, so we thought we would just tackle it,” said Deacon Tim McNeil, spokesman for the archdiocese. from Omaha.

Some of the policy requirements include prohibiting schools from condoning or promoting a view of sexual identity that is contrary to Church teachings and theology about the nature of humanity and God’s purpose.

It also requires staff to act towards a person based on their biological sex at birth. Students will also be required to act, dress, and use the restroom the same and will not be able to join sports teams that oppose their biological sex.

Shipman thinks the policy is hypocritical.

“If you just sit there and force all these rules saying you can’t do this, this, this and that, well, why can’t you?” asked Shipman. “They don’t even talk about it. If you love someone, it comes from the heart and if you really have the spirit of God inside of you, your heart will want to help and do for others.”

Deacon McNeil says politics comes from a place of love and welcomes any discussion this school year.

“Our ethos going forward is truth and love. We share truth with our students and their families. At the same time, we bring our love and compassion,” McNeil said.

You can read the full policy here.


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